2019-2021 Legislative Request: $50M

By the end of the biennium in mid-2019, WAWSA will have completed approximately $345 million worth of water supply, treatment, transmission, and distribution projects across five counties in northwest North Dakota.

 

“As we prepare for the upcoming legislative session, the Western Area Water Supply Authority (WAWSA) Board is grateful for the State Water Commission and legislators’ ongoing support for the project. We’ve delivered drinking water to about 60,000 people so far, but there are still rural areas that are waiting for service from WAWS,” says Curtis Wilson, WAWSA Executive Director.

 

WAWSA will request $50 million during the 2019 legislative session which begins in January. If the funding request is approved, WAWSA will be able to complete projects in several rural areas where current water supplies are limited and generally of poor quality.

 

Here are the projects proposed for the 2019-2021 biennium:

 

R&T Water Supply Commerce Authority - East White Earth Alternates | Estimated Cost: $6 million

This rural water service expansion in central Mountrail County is located east of the White Earth River Valley. The project will provide service via 75 miles of pipeline. A phased approach may be implemented to stay within budget due to the increased interest in service from rural residents.

 

R&T Water Supply Commerce Authority - West White Earth Alternates | Estimated Cost: $3 million

The project would expand services to rural users through 25 miles of pipeline in western Mountrail County and eastern Williams County, west of the White Earth River Valley.

 

McKenzie County Water Resource District – System I Expansion Part 2 | Estimated Cost: $7 million

A rural water service expansion would benefit new users in central McKenzie County, south of Watford City through 65 miles of pipeline. Very poor water quality is of concern in this area due to high concentrations of dissolved minerals in ground and surface waters with nitrogen concentrations that have been fatal to livestock.

 

Northwest Rural Water District - North 200K Rural Distribution | Estimated Cost: $3.5 million

New rural customers in central Williams County to the northwest of Williston would receive WAWSA service via 50 miles of pipeline. Similar to the R&T East White Earth Alternates project, it is likely this will be phased to stay within the project budget due to increased interest in water service.

 

29 Mile Rural Distribution | Estimated Cost: $8.5 million

Northwest Williams County and south-central Divide County would benefit from the construction of 93 miles of pipeline for new rural customers. This project will likely be phased to stay within the project budget due to increased interest in water service.

 

R&T Water Supply Commerce Authority Service to Powers Lake | Estimated Cost: $5 million

The City of Powers Lake and rural users would receive WAWSA service through 15 miles of pipeline.

 

R&T Water Supply Commerce Service to Stanley – Phase II | Estimated Cost: $12 million

This project will add approximately 16.5 miles of a 20-inch transmission line between the R&T Water Supply Commerce Authority’s Tioga High Point and Ross High Point reservoirs to complete a phased transmission expansion to Stanley. The result of the project will be an increased capacity to serve the City of Stanley.

 

Stanley Rural Distribution Part 2 | Estimated Cost: $5 million

Rural customers in south-central Mountrail County would benefit from 56 miles of pipeline. Similar to several other projects, Stanley Rural Distribution Part 2 will likely be phased to stay within the project budget due to increased interest in water service.

 

At the end of the current biennium, about one third of the project, with an estimated cost of $167 million, will still need to be completed. Funding requests beyond the upcoming 2019-2021 biennium will be determined by the rate of population growth in northwest North Dakota and the associated domestic water demands to serve that population.

“WAWSA is trying to deliver service to as many of the people who have signed up, as project funding allows. We are optimistic the legislature and State Water Commission will continue to recognize the value in our effort to bring drinking water to thousands of people’s taps who didn’t have high quality water until recently,” says Wilson.